2 Physicists who invented methods to observe and measure the behavior of individual particles have won the Nobel Prize in Physics. Photo credit to wptv.com

Stockholm – The Nobel Prize Committee announced last Tuesday morning that the 2 Physicists who invented methods to observe and measure the behavior of individual particles have won the Nobel Prize in Physics.

The winners – French Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, 68 years old, have found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behavior that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments.

David Wineland explained his own work as a “parlor trick” that executed the seemingly magical feature of putting an object in 2 places at once. Some scientists praised the achievements as bringing to life the wildest dreams of science fiction.

Both scientists independently developed ways to study individual particles of matter and light without destroying them. A feature that was previously thought to be impossible because quantum particles lose their special properties when they are interacted with.

The scientists at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in Stockholm, Sweden stated that the Nobel prize awardees have found ways to isolate the subatomic particles and keep their properties intact at the same time.

More often than not, when these particles interact with the outside world, the properties that scientists would like to directly observe disappear, leaving researchers postulating over what is going on with them. These 2 scientists have found a way around this, making direct observation possible. “The new methods allow them to examine, control and count the particles.”

Quantum physics is a study of the behavior of the fundamental building blocks of the universe at a scale smaller than atoms, when tiny particles act in strange ways that can only be described with advanced mathematics.

Mainly, Physics is the second of this year’s top of awards; scientists from Japan and Britain shared the first prize last Monday, in medicine, for adult stem cell research. The prizes, which reward achievements in science, literature and peace, were first awarded in 1901 in harmony with the will of Swedish dynamite millionaire Alfred Nobel.

French Serge Haroche and American David Wineland will share the $1.2 million prize, the second of 6 Nobel Prizes announced within the month.