THE VETS ARE IN. The Born to be Wild hosts Doc Ferds Recio and Doc Nielsen Donato shares adventures on their weekly documentaries on wild animals.
THE VETS ARE IN. The Born to be Wild hosts Doc Ferds Recio and Doc Nielsen Donato shares adventures on their weekly documentaries on wild animals.

The adventure of the ‘Born To Be Wild’ crews and hosts for the wild bats, water snakes and other animals in the Philippines continue bringing more excitements to Filipino viewers.

In Bohol, known to be the haven of small specie animals, show host Doc Ferds Recio and a team of experts have documented eight (8) out of the 35 species of bats.

Through mist nets, bat biologists are able to study the bats up close.  Doc Ferds, as others fondly called him, gets the opportunity to see them up close as part of an ongoing study of bats in the area.

Doc Ferds also encountered ferocious insect bats, often with large ears, noses and fangs. “Fruit bats have a more prominent snout and rat-like appearance,” says Ferds.

And while these bats may have monstrous looks, Doc Ferds says its real purpose is a controller of pests and “farmers” of the wild. “These bats serve human society in great ways we may never have imagined,” the veterinary TV host added.

born to be wild adventuresMeanwhile, another host Doc Nielsen Donato’s search for the walo-walo or blue-banded sea krait is proving to be more difficult.

Records show that the sea krait was seen in Taal during Spanish times.  But quakes and volcanic eruptions drastically transformed Taal into the one of a kind lake that it is today.

Doc Nielsen has more stories to say as he uncovers what could possibly have happened to the blue-banded sea krait once documented in Taal, and why the popular lake still remains one of the richest places for new discoveries.

The duo invites their followers to catch their finale of this month’s series on bats and water snakes in Born to be Wild this Wednesday, February 27, after Saksi on GMA-7.